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SC Dept. of Agriculture cracking down on use of hemp, CBD in pet treats

The South Carolina Department of Agriculture (SCDA) is taking steps to let businesses know if...
The South Carolina Department of Agriculture (SCDA) is taking steps to let businesses know if they are illegally selling hemp and cannabidiol (CBD) products.(Source: Live 5)
Updated: Jan. 3, 2020 at 7:33 PM EST
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CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - The South Carolina Department of Agriculture is taking steps to let businesses know if they are illegally selling hemp and cannabidiol products.

“We’re seeing an influx of products on the market for people with pets," the feed program coordinator for the South Carolina Department of Agriculture, Austin Therrell, said.

According to the SCDA, ingredients used in animal feed in the United States undergo a scientific review by the FDA Center for Veterinary Medicine prior to being allowed for sale or distribution in the US. But hemp and CBD have not undergone that review.

“There is some confusion because there aren’t any regulations on it right now," Therrell said. “As of right now, there haven’t been any hemp-derived ingredients that have been approved to use in animal feed.”

David Bulick, one of the first hemp farmers in South Carolina, grows the plant in Ridgeville. He said it can get confusing figuring out what is allowed and what is not allowed.

“We’re making sure that we’re inside the lines," Bulick said. “There’s not a book we’ve found that has all the regulations, that covers state and federal, what you can and what you can’t do. You have to ask.”

Bulick said he sells tinctures and uses them on his dogs.

“They aren’t regulated under the department, we don’t claim any wellness from it. We’ve got some good personal results from our pets and we have two dogs and it helps them with their anxiety,” Bulick said.

Starting in early January, the SCDA will send manufacturers a formal letter letting them know when illegal products are found in distribution. A company will then have the option to reformulate the product to remove the hemp and/or CBD ingredient and submit a formal registration application.

If businesses do not do this, it could “result in further regulatory action” by the SCDA.

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