Education Oversight Committee watches School Swap series - wistv.com - Columbia, South Carolina

Education Oversight Committee watches School Swap series

(Statewide) Dec. 12, 2005 - In the WIS School Swap series, we took two students, one from a rural school, another from a suburban school. They swapped schools, then told us how money, learning environment, and opportunities all affect education.

Monday, the series was the topic of discussion at the state Education Oversight Committee. That's a group of lawmakers, educators, and business people who help make education policy.

WIS' Craig Melvin was asked to show the series and then answer questions about the two girls' experiences.

Karen Iacovelli runs a manufacturing business in the Upstate. She says public education in the state is so bad, we should consider scrapping the system, "I'm not optimistic."

After watching our School Swap series, Iacovelli isn't convinced the problem is purely rural, "I don't think it's really a rural problem. It's a systemic issue; it's a cultural issue. In the United States it definitely is an issue of where we rank education in our families."

For fellow committee member Tracy Young-Cooper the solution to the education crisis lies in getting the best teachers to the areas that need them most, "Great teachers want to work at state-of-the-art schools. They want to work in communities in which the community buys in to what they're trying to do. And right now in these rural areas they're not find that, so it's very difficult to attract the best and the brightest teachers there."

Reported by Craig Melvin

Posted 8:25pm by Chantelle Janelle

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