2018 SC Voters election guide: Ballot questions, polling places, - wistv.com - Columbia, South Carolina

2018 SC Voters election guide: Ballot questions, polling places, and more on the June 12 primaries

(Source: WIS) (Source: WIS)
COLUMBIA, SC (WIS) -

There will be primary elections held in South Carolina on June 12. 

If you're like most people, you're asking yourself this: who's running? Where do I vote? What will be on the ballots? Here's a running list of everything you need to know before heading to the polls: 

What are we voting for?

Primary elections are when registered voters select a candidate whom they believe should be a political party's candidate for elected office to run in the general election and do more than select nominees. 

The primary election on June 12 involves candidates seeking ballot spots for the November general election for state governor, secretary of state, attorney general, the Fifth Circuit Solicitor's Office, various county sheriffs including Kershaw County, and various school board and city seats. 

Election dates to know

  • June 12 - statewide primaries 
  • June 26 - primary runoff elections 
  • Nov. 6 - general elections

Polling places 

If you're planning to vote in the primary, you can check SCVotes.org for your polling location. It's the "Find Your Precinct" option in the upper right.

If you do not have your voter registration card and do not know your precinct name, you can use the "Check Your Voter Registration" feature found in the menu under "Voters."

Remember: polls open at 7 a.m. and close at 7 p.m. 

Anyone who may run into some trouble at the polls can call the Election Protection Hotline at 1-888-OUR-VOTE. The free, nonpartisan hotline will be returning calls leading up to primary day on June 12 and will be live on a primary day between 6 a.m. and 8 p.m. By calling the 1-866-OUR-VOTE hotline (or 888-VE-Y-Vota), you can confirm your registration status, find your polling location, and get answers to questions about proper identification at the polls.  

More Voter information

Here are a few things you need to know if you want to vote for specific races on Tuesday: 

  • You can only vote on a Democratic or Republican ballot on the June 12 primary. For example, if you traditionally vote Republican but you want to vote in the Fifth Circuit Solicitor's race, you'd have to vote with a Democratic ballot since both candidates are both Democrats and only appear on that ballot.  
  • You can only vote for the races on that specific ballot. (See above example) 
  • If there is a runoff election, you can only vote as you did in the primary. So, you voted Democrat on June 12, you could not turn around and vote Republican for any potential June 26 runoff. 
  • BUT, if you didn't vote in the primary, you can vote however you'd like in any runoff election. 

Ballot questions

There will be a couple of questions on your ballot come primary time.

  • On the Democratic ballot, you'll be asked whether or not you support a state law allowing doctors to prescribe medical marijuana.
  • On the Republican side, a top question will be whether or not you believe voters should have the option to affiliate with a political party when they register to vote.

Here are what the questions look like: 

Democratic Primary

  1. Do you support passing a state law allowing doctors to prescribe medical marijuana to patients?
  2. Do you support passing a state law requiring the governor of South Carolina to accept all federal revenues offered to support Medicaid and Medicaid expansion efforts in the state?

Republican Primary

  1. Do you believe that voters should have the option to choose to affiliate with a political party when they register to vote or change their voter registration in South Carolina?
  2. Do you believe that South Carolina’s tax code should be brought into conformity with the new Trump tax cuts in the federal tax code for maximum simplification and to lower the overall tax burden on South Carolina taxpayers and businesses? (An explanation of this can be found here.) 

For a full understanding of the primary advisory questions, SC Votes has more information. 

Get to know the candidates

A number of profiles have been completed on the candidates for the BIG officers. You can find out more about the candidates here: 

Finally, the SC State Elections Commission has issued a list of the 10 top questions voters ask: 

Copyright 2018 WIS. All rights reserved. 

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