City of Columbia considering train 'quiet zones' - wistv.com - Columbia, South Carolina

City of Columbia considering train 'quiet zones'

City of Columbia considering train 'quiet zones'

City leaders discussed the possibility of train quiet zones. (WIS) City leaders discussed the possibility of train quiet zones. (WIS)
COLUMBIA, SC (WIS) -

People in The City of Columbia want less noise from trains, and officials are considering "Quiet Zones."

City officials say some parts of the city hear more than a hundred horn blasts a day when the rails are busy. Each train blows the horn multiple times as it passes through a crossing.

City leaders met Monday night to talk about the problem, but they say the process is complicated and costly.

"Many people have asked that question- why can't the city just tell the trains to stop? And a city can't do that because it's by federal regulation," Chairperson of the Quiet Zone Committee Brenda Kramar said. "So we have to jump through some hoops and spend some money to upgrade the crossings in a way that will allow us to have the trains stop blowing their horns."

In 2005, the Federal Railroad Administration passed a rule that requires trains to blow their horns at every crossing at all times of day. 

Each inspection to consider an area for a quiet zone cost $15,000.

City officials say they will apply for grants to fund the inspections.

Copyright 2018 WIS. All rights reserved. 

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