Thousands to rally for Special Olympics to end the 'R' word - wistv.com - Columbia, South Carolina

Thousands to rally for Special Olympics to end the 'R' word

Thousands are expected to rally for Special Olympics at the State House Tuesday morning. (WIS) Thousands are expected to rally for Special Olympics at the State House Tuesday morning. (WIS)
(WIS) -

Thousands rallied to the South Carolina Statehouse to call for inclusion Tuesday morning. 

People from across the state - from students to teachers, to administrators and families - showed up this morning to "end the 'R' word."

It's all part of a push for inclusion in schools. Special Olympics of South Carolina says hurtful words put limitations on what their team members can do.

"Well, we want to end the 'R' word," Morgan McLeod, with Special Olympics of South Carolina. "We're around all these wonderful students every day and we want them to have the same opportunities and not feel that they aren't one of us. We're always inclusive."

Special Olympics events start in April. The summer games will be held at Fort Jackson on the second weekend of May.

Special Olympics provides resources, funding and technical assistance to these schools as they carry out this unified program.  The message of Unified Champion Schools is reaching more than 150,000 students in South Carolina this school year!  The State House Rally is a culmination of these advocacy initiatives, allowing students and school leaders to come together as a united, statewide voice. 
 
Special Olympics South Carolina provides year-round athletic training and competition for 28,902 children and adults with intellectual disabilities along with more than 6,000 unified partners without intellectual disabilities. 

In all, 26 Olympic-type sports and hold more than 400 competitions annually are offered for athletes to participate in. 

Copyright 2018 WIS. All rights reserved. 

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