Guignard park in Cayce reopens - wistv.com - Columbia, South Carolina

Guignard park in Cayce reopens

Guignard Park in Cayce was ceremoniously reopened Saturday morning with a ribbon cutting and celebration. (Source: WISTV) Guignard Park in Cayce was ceremoniously reopened Saturday morning with a ribbon cutting and celebration. (Source: WISTV)
CAYCE, SC (WIS) -

Guignard Park in Cayce reopened Saturday morning with a ribbon cutting and celebration.

The park has been closed for nearly a year to undergo several improvements. Those improvements included new ADA compliant sidewalks, new benches and picnic tables and a concrete ping pong table.

"It means a lot to the neighborhood as we try to attract a younger generation with families and younger children. It's a nice place for them to come, and it tells them that we are very excited to have them here. That we provide these types of places for their families,” Cayce Councilwoman Tara Almond said.

Guignard Park was gifted to the City of Cayce several years ago with one condition: the city must maintain it. Part of that included securing an eroding creek, making sure it can be enjoyed for generations to come. 

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