Racing and baseball make a home run - wistv.com - Columbia, South Carolina

Racing and baseball make a home run

Jordan Anderson (Source: Columbia Metropolitan Convention & Visitors Bureau) Jordan Anderson (Source: Columbia Metropolitan Convention & Visitors Bureau)
COLUMBIA, SC (WIS) -

"Drivers, start your engines" and "play ball" will collide Wednesday night when race car driver Jordan Anderson from Forest Acres will throw out the first pitch at the Columbia Fireflies game.

Jordan is a NASCAR driver in the Camping World Truck Series. He says he’s passionate about living life and striving for excellence. So, he “races” to any chance to show off his car and love of sports in general.

Jordan will have his vehicle outside the gates of Spirit Communications Park before the game against the Lexington Legends.

Fans can get their photo taken with Jordan and his racing truck. Jordan drives for Bolen Motorsports, backed by the Columbia Metropolitan Convention & Visitors Bureau and Columbia Regional Sports Council. 

Copyright 2016 WIS. All rights reserved.

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