WIS Investigates: More than $1.5M spent on SCSU lawsuits in 7 ye - wistv.com - Columbia, South Carolina

WIS Investigates: More than $1.5M spent on SCSU lawsuits in 7 years

ORANGEBURG, SC (WIS) -

Most of the news coming out of South Carolina State University the deals with lawsuits filed by either students, the former president, and even former employees turned whistleblowers. 

According to our analysis, if you sue SC State, there's a good chance you'll win and the taxpayers will pick up the tab.

Since 2008, 33 lawsuits have been filed and eventually settled against the school. More than half of them dealt with employment disputes and allegations of libel and slander, discrimination, or civil rights violations from former employees.

The University has paid more than $1.5 million in legal fees and settlements since 2008 and that number doesn't count pending cases. School officials lost or settled in almost all of their cases- unlike any of the other state universities we researched.

“The numbers are large on both sides,” said Attorney Lewis Cromer, who represented some of the plaintiffs in the cases against SC State. “That means cases should have been settled that were not settled. That means taxpayers are paying big lawyer fees to defend the case, yet in the end, there's money going to the other side. To the employee who wins the case; who settles the case.”

Coming up at 5 p.m., we take a closer look at who's suing the school and why they face so many more lawsuits than schools with more than double the enrollment.

Copyright 2015 WIS. All rights reserved.

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