SC State president files for injunction against school - wistv.com - Columbia, South Carolina

SC State president files for injunction against school

ORANGEBURG, SC (WIS) - South Carolina State University President Thomas Elzey has filed for a temporary injunction against the school, claiming the university has breached his contract and caused harm to his reputation.

Elzey, who was put on administrative leave by the university's Board of Trustees, filed his complaint that would prevent the board from taking any further action on his employment.

In the 16-page complaint, Elzey alleges he has suffered lost wages, severe psychological harm, emotional distress, anxiety, pain and suffering, inconvenience, mental anguish, embarrassment, humiliation, and even physical injuries due to the strife between him and the board.

Elzey says the school had experienced years of poor financial management before he was hired.

The complaint also says the university breached Elzey's contract when they placed him on leave and that there was no cause for his removal. Elzey also believes the board will move to terminate his contract without cause, saying certain board members' and politicians opinions of him will influence that termination. 

At this point, Elzey remains on paid leave, but the board has already installed W. Franklin Evans as acting president.  

A hearing on the injunction will take place on March 19 at 9:30 a.m.

Copyright 2015 WIS. All rights reserved.

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