SC State board places Thomas Elzey on administrative leave - wistv.com - Columbia, South Carolina

SC State board places Thomas Elzey on administrative leave

ORANGEBURG, SC (WIS) -

The Board of Trustees at South Carolina State University has voted unanimously to place President Thomas Elzey on administrative leave.

The board met in executive session during a special meeting on Monday before making the decision.

Elzey offered no comment after the session and quickly left the board room.

The board then moved quickly to replace Elzey with W. Franklin Evans as the interim provost.

“Under my leadership, we will continue to move forward in preserving the rich legacy of excellence that is SC State University," Evans said in a statement. "These are critical times at SC State; therefore, it is imperative that we remain focused on the matters most important to the institution's short-and long-term sustainability. I will serve, at the direction of the Board of Trustees, with pride, integrity and transparency, for as long as I am called upon.”

The decision comes days after lawmakers opted to revise a proviso to replace the school's entire board with a temporary one and remove the president. Trustees have noted that the administrative leave is with pay.

"The decisions that we made today were made in the best interest of this university -- South Carolina State University -- and we stand behind those decisions," SC State Board Secretary Ronald Henegan said, "and we think those decisions are strong decisions that will confine to meet our goals and objectives and our mission statement and will keep this university moving forward."

Members of the board made the decision before returning to executive session in Lowman Hall.

Copyright 2015 WIS. All rights reserved.

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