WIS investigates those left nameless, voiceless in SC - wistv.com - Columbia, South Carolina

WIS investigates those left nameless, voiceless in SC

Law enforcement reviews a case involving an unidentified woman and man found in Sumter County in the 1980s. The couple still does not have a name. (Source: WIS) Law enforcement reviews a case involving an unidentified woman and man found in Sumter County in the 1980s. The couple still does not have a name. (Source: WIS)
South Carolina (WIS) -

There are hundreds of nameless people known only to law enforcement as Jane or John Doe.

Fifty-nine of them in South Carolina have been found dead during the last four decades, and to this day, no one knows who they are. They're nameless – some are victims of crimes, while others have unknown circumstances. Their families do not know what happened to them.

All we have to solve the mystery of their death is the remains they leave behind, and the hope that someday they'll be identified.

“They never stop looking for these individuals,” said Gary Watts, Richland County coroner. “It's important for them, and it's important for the family to have closure. Everyone we deal with has a family. Everyone has someone who cares about them and loves them and wants to know what happened to them.”

Thursday at 5 p.m. and 11 p.m., Investigative Reporter PJ Randhawa brings you the faces and cases that have eluded law enforcement for decades.

Copyright 2015 WIS. All rights reserved. 

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