Flooding forces drivers to find alternate routes in Orangeburg - wistv.com - Columbia, South Carolina

Flooding forces drivers to find alternate routes in Orangeburg

ORANGEBURG COUNTY, SC (WIS) -

Heavy rains have forced motorists to find alternate routes in and around Orangeburg County.

According to the South Carolina Highway Patrol, flooding forced Chestnut Street near a pharmacy and a railroad overpass to close. Hannah Wimberly of the S.C. Highway Patrol says that is the only road that has been closed.

In fact, Highway Patrol troopers say they sent an aquatic team to rescue a driver in a submerged vehicle on Chestnut Street.

"I was coming through this way by the traffic light and there was a person's car stuck under the bridge," Anastasia Waring said, "and there was an 18-wheeler trying to block people from coming that way. It was overwhelming. There was a lot of water and people's cars were getting stuck."

The Orangeburg Department of Public Safety and Orangeburg County Sheriff's Office were on hand with the Highway Patrol to help direct traffic away from the flooded area.

Issues on parts of Cannon Bridge Road have been reported as well. Authorities are also reporting that Boulevard Street near Old St. Matthews Road and Columbia Road is also washed out.

Neighbors near Boulevard Street said they got nervous watching the water rise inch by inch. But now, conditions are looking better as Highway Patrol reported no floods in the area at the moment

Copyright 2014 WIS. All rights reserved.

  • Trending StoriesTrending StoriesMore>>

  • Parents make heartbreaking decision over son with autism

    Parents make heartbreaking decision over son with autism

    Wednesday, May 24 2017 11:10 AM EDT2017-05-24 15:10:16 GMT
    KMOV has chosen not to identify him by name or show pictures of what he currently looks like. (Credit: Wallens)KMOV has chosen not to identify him by name or show pictures of what he currently looks like. (Credit: Wallens)

    A parent's love knows no bounds. But what happens when you truly believe your child is going to harm himself or someone else? One family tells News 4 they made a heartbreaking decision about their son with autism, all because they felt they had no other options. 

    More >>

    A parent's love knows no bounds. But what happens when you truly believe your child is going to harm himself or someone else? One family tells News 4 they made a heartbreaking decision about their son with autism, all because they felt they had no other options. 

    More >>
  • Breaking

    Kirbyville High School principal resigns, then shoots, kills self in parking lot

    Kirbyville High School principal resigns, then shoots, kills self in parking lot

    Wednesday, May 24 2017 11:31 AM EDT2017-05-24 15:31:33 GMT

    Following his resignation Tuesday afternoon, the principal of Kirbyville High School walked out his truck, where he apparently shot and killed himself, according to police.

    More >>

    Following his resignation Tuesday afternoon, the principal of Kirbyville High School walked out his truck, where he apparently shot and killed himself, according to police.

    More >>
  • Deadly virus threatens local crawfish industry

    Deadly virus threatens local crawfish industry

    Tuesday, May 23 2017 7:26 PM EDT2017-05-23 23:26:19 GMT

    A deadly virus is threatening the crawfish industry in Southwest Louisiana. It's called white spot syndrome virus and it was first discovered in Thailand, but somehow it made its way to ponds in South Louisiana and specialists are struggling to find the funds to research a solution.  “The catch was increasing and increasing and then it dropped 70% and that's when you saw the dead crawfish floating in the water,” said a crawfish farmer of 34 years, Ian Garbarino. He...

    More >>

    A deadly virus is threatening the crawfish industry in Southwest Louisiana. It's called white spot syndrome virus and it was first discovered in Thailand, but somehow it made its way to ponds in South Louisiana and specialists are struggling to find the funds to research a solution.  “The catch was increasing and increasing and then it dropped 70% and that's when you saw the dead crawfish floating in the water,” said a crawfish farmer of 34 years, Ian Garbarino. He...

    More >>
Powered by Frankly