The end of daylight saving time can actually be bad for your hea - wistv.com - Columbia, South Carolina

The end of daylight saving time can actually be bad for your health

COLUMBIA, SC (WIS) -

If you're like me you woke up Sunday briefly confused about two things: 1) Why did I sleep in a suit, and 2) How did I forget about the end of daylight saving time!?

Yes, that means you had an extra hour in the sun or more likely, in bed. That's something we can all agree with, right?

"I love it because I get more sleep," said Olivia Mitchell.

"I don't like that," said Carol Prescott. 

Now before you go bashing Carol, hear her out. "I think it does mess with your system, you know," shes said.

Carol is right, but we'll get to that in just a second.

Back during World War I the U.S. started shifting the hours to try to conserve energy, though there's been no conclusive evidence that it actually does. Some think we did it "for the farmers." So we asked one.

"It really doesn't affect us really," said Jeffrey Kaigler. "A day is a day. When the sun goes up and the sun goes down."

"I personally don't think daylight saving is very helpful," said Dr. Laura Herpel, a sleep doctor from Midlands Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine.

Herpel says springing forward in March could affect your health, yes, even if it's just an hour.

"If someone is sleep deprived, they may have higher blood pressure, higher heart rates," said Herpel.

And a slightly higher risk for heart attack, studies show. That's what comes with losing just an hour when we spring forward. But that's not all, drivers in Canada were found to get into 8 percent more traffic accidents the day after they lost an hour of sleep when compared to a normal day.

"That's huge," said Herpel. "That's one hour that's made a significant difference."

Despite that, DST is here to stay for the time being. And since it now gets dark at 6 p.m., no more complaints, only dreams now.

Copyright 2013 WIS. All rights reserved.

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