Two dead following plane crash in San Francisco - wistv.com - Columbia, South Carolina |

Mayor: All accounted for in deadly San Francisco plane crash

Posted: Updated:
An investigation is underway on a plane crash in San Francisco. (Source: KRON/CNN) An investigation is underway on a plane crash in San Francisco. (Source: KRON/CNN)
Video from KTVU in San Francisco shows the Asiana Airlines plane that crashed in San Francisco. (Source: KTVU/CNN) Video from KTVU in San Francisco shows the Asiana Airlines plane that crashed in San Francisco. (Source: KTVU/CNN)
David Eun posted this photo on the social media website "Path" after exiting the plane that crashed. (Source: David Eun/Path) David Eun posted this photo on the social media website "Path" after exiting the plane that crashed. (Source: David Eun/Path)
Passengers inside San Francisco International Airport watch the aftermath of a plane crash that occurred there Saturday. (Source: Olivia Korte/Instagram) Passengers inside San Francisco International Airport watch the aftermath of a plane crash that occurred there Saturday. (Source: Olivia Korte/Instagram)
Samsung executive David Eun was on board the aircraft. (Source: David Eun/Path) Samsung executive David Eun was on board the aircraft. (Source: David Eun/Path)

(RNN) – San Francisco Mayor Edwin Lee confirmed they have accounted for everyone in Saturday's fatal crash of a Boeing 777. There are two confirmed fatalities in the plane crash.

A total of 307 people - 291 passengers and 16 crew members - were on board Asiana Airlines Flight 214 as it attempted to land after an approximately 10-hour flight from Seoul, South Korea.

According to CNN, the two were Chinese girls in their mid-teens, Asiana Airlines's CEO Yoon Young-doo said. The two girls were found outside the rear of the plane, according to San Francisco Fire Chief Joanne Hayes-White. The girls were traveling with a group of high school students.

"I bow my head and sincerely apologize for causing concern to the passengers, families and our people," Yoon said.

The next press conference will be Sunday morning jointly with the NTSB. The location and time has not been announced yet.

Aerial pictures of the aftermath showed the plane's tail completely detached, but both wings were still connected to the fuselage. A trail of debris littered the area, beginning where the plane touched down and leading up to where it came to a stop in a grassy area between the runway and taxiway.

There is only a short distance from the front edge of the runway to San Francisco Bay.

"The moment it touched the runway there was a bang, and we realized something has gone wrong, something terrible has happened," passenger Vedpal Singh said. "It's difficult, you know. Your instincts take over, and you really don't know what's really going on. The moment it touched the runway, it was pretty loud."

San Francisco General Hospital, the only Level 1 trauma center in the area, has received 52 patients in four different waves. Each successive wave of people has been in decreasing degrees of seriousness.

An initial group of 10 people who were all in critical condition were treated, but five of them had since been upgraded to serious. Some of their injuries included burns, bone fractures and spinal, according to hospital spokeswoman Rachel Kagan.

"The rest, we do not have their conditions yet," said Kagan. "They're being assessed, but not all of them will be admitted."

At least three additional hospitals reported receiving patients from the crash.

Asiana Airlines released a statement saying it "is currently investigating the specific cause of the incident as well as any injuries that may have been sustained to passengers as a result."

The company confirmed 141 of the passengers were Chinese citizens, 77 Korean, 61 U.S., one Japanese and 11 others of unspecified nationalities.

San Francisco Fire Chief Joanne Hayes-White said during an earlier news conference her crew responded to a "hard landing" at 11:27 a.m. Pacific time. They started conducting a search-and-rescue operation on board the aircraft.

Hayes-White said after securing the scene they turned their investigation over to the FBI.

The last fatal commercial airplane crash in the U.S. was Feb. 12, 2009, when a Continental Express flight crashed into a home in Buffalo, NY, killing all 49 people on board and one person inside the home.

Lee placed his emphasis on comforting the victims.

"We're deeply saddened by this incident, and our thoughts and prayers are with our friends and those affected," Lee said.

Lee also expressed his sympathy to South Korea, where the plane's operator, Asiana Airlines, is based.

The flight originated in Shanghai, China, and stopped in Seoul, South Korea, before continuing to San Francisco.

The weather was clear at the time of the crash, and local station KTVU reported there was little to no wind.

During a press conference in Washington, DC, National Transportation Safety Board Chairwoman Debbie Hersman said three investigators based in Los Angeles are deploying to the scene to start the investigation. An additional team from Washington, DC, will be arriving some time late Saturday or early Sunday.

"We have a lot of work to do. When our teams arrive on scene, we're going to be looking for the cockpit recorder and see if it was working at the time of the crash," Hersman said. "We haven't determined what the focus of this investigation will be. We have to gather the facts before we can make any conclusions. NTSB investigations are very thorough."

Around 6:30 p.m. Eastern, the airport confirmed two runways had been reopened, but the runway where the crash occurred and an adjacent runway remain closed.

Video of the aftermath of the crash shows smoke rising from the plane and passengers leaving the wreckage using the inflatable slides attached to the plane's side doors.

CNN reported witnesses heard a pop and saw a fireball emerge from under the plane.

An eyewitness told San Francisco's KCBS the plane looked like it was "at an odd angle" as it was coming in to land.

That statement was backed up by another witness, Stephanie Turner, who told MSNBC the plane tried to land at too steep of an angle.

"(I) noticed the tail was too low. The plane came in at a bad angle; the tail clipped the runway," Turner said. "It went through quite a few acrobatics on the runway. It went behind (another plane). Instead of coming in flat, it was coming in at, I'd say, a 45-degree angle."

David Eun posted a photograph on Twitter shortly after the crash showing passengers leaving the wreck. Eun, who is an executive at Samsung, said he was on board the plane during the crash.

Shortly after posting the picture, Eun tweeted, "Fire and rescue people all over the place. They're evacuating the injured. I haven't felt this way since 9/11." He also said that most of the passengers appeared to be OK.

Various witnesses told CNN the plane spun sideways once it hit the ground.

"Nose wheel never hit the ground. There was no fireball after the initial one," Anthony Castorani, a witness at the airport, said. "There was a white plume of smoke, then after they doused it for about 20 minutes, there was some lighter smoke."

Chloe Harrington, 13, was on a plane on the runway when it happened. She said she "saw pillars of smoke coming up. A plane with the tail completely missing. We got news it had crashed upon landing."

There were no first responders on the runway as the plane landed, and other planes were lined up ready for takeoff.

All air traffic out of San Francisco International Airport was canceled for about three hours, and arriving aircraft were diverted to different airports in the region.

The FBI said there were no indications of terrorism or criminal activity associated with the crash.

Boeing tweeted a statement that said, "Our thoughts are with everyone affected by today's incident at SFO. We stand ready to assist the NTSB."

The investigation into the crash will center on the condition and competency of the pilot, the flight date recorder inside the plane and the communications between the flight crew and the air traffic control tower to identify what went wrong.

Copyright 2013 Raycom News Network. All rights reserved.

Powered by WorldNow