'Shake and bake' meth becoming popular method to produce drug - wistv.com - Columbia, South Carolina |

'Shake and bake' meth becoming popular method to produce drug

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LEXINGTON COUNTY, SC (WIS) -

Meth cases are mounting in the Midlands. On Monday, we told you about a Lexington County couple arrested and charged for cooking meth inside soda bottles at their home.

It's not a new trick, but it's becoming more common.

"It can be produced almost anywhere now it's very mobile," said Lexington County Sheriff James Metts.

Metts fights a new kind of battle meth these days. His department, along with others across the state, are seeing fewer of the old-school labs that you'd find in out buildings and mobile homes, and more soda bottles used for what's called "shake and bake" meth.

"The mobility of the drug allows it to be made anywhere, not just rural areas," said Metts.

You might find the ingredients under your sink or in your garage. All you do is combine them in a plastic bottle that can then be transported in a trunk, backpack, or even your pants.

The convenience has made it popular. SLED reports an astounding spike. In 2012, the number of labs found in South Carolina jumped 330 percent from the previous year. This year is on track to be just as bad.

Metts attributes it to increased awareness. He says his deputies have a better idea of what to look for and so does the public.

"We're getting more opportunities to find the labs and we're getting more reports of meth trash," said Metts.

That trash leads officers to the leftovers that SLED says affects the community through the environment, children placed in foster care, and hospital stays to uninsured users who don't know what they're doing.

And if you think it's only happening out in the country, one lab was recently busted in Richland County not far from USC's baseball field.

"It is moving now out of the rural areas into almost anywhere because of the way it's produced," said Metts.

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