Troopers: One person ejected and killed in I-26 crash - wistv.com - Columbia, South Carolina

Troopers: One person ejected and killed in I-26 crash

(Source: Jennifer Emert) (Source: Jennifer Emert)

LEXINGTON, SC (WIS) - Highway Patrol troopers are investigating a single-vehicle crash that resulted in a fatality on Interstate 26 Tuesday afternoon.

The incident happened around noon in the westbound lanes near mile marker 109, which is in the vicinity of the U.S. 378 exit.

Trooper Billy Elder says the driver of the vehicle involved in the collision was ejected and died on the scene. Investigators say he was not wearing a seatbelt.

The Lexington County Coroner's Office identified the victim as William Dale Maples, 49, of West Columbia SC

Earlier in the day, troopers said investigators were looking for a pick-up truck with wood paneling on the sides that was carrying trash and/or bags. They have since rescinded that statement.

The crash caused major traffic issues in the area while the Highway Patrol investigated the incident.

If you witnessed the collision or know anything about this incident, you are urged to call the South Carolina Highway Patrol at 1-800-768-1501 or dial #HP on a mobile phone.

Copyright 2013 WIS. All rights reserved

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