Berry, DeJesus, Knight: We are happy, safe and thankful - wistv.com - Columbia, South Carolina

Rescued women: We are happy, safe and thankful

Amanda Berry, Gina DeJesus and Michelle Knight Amanda Berry, Gina DeJesus and Michelle Knight

A new message of gratitude from the three women rescued after spending nearly a decade in captivity on Cleveland's west side.

In a letter released through a local law firm, Amanda Berry, Gina DeJesus and Michelle Knight thank the community for their continued support.

The women say they "are happy and safe and continue to heal, a process that requires time and privacy. " 

The women say they are beyond appreciative by the offers of support. The outpouring of public support, they say, has been nothing short of remarkable.

"To have complete strangers offer loving support in the form of money, goods and services, reaching out to help like a family member, is appreciated in ways that are impossible to put into words," the women say in the letter.

Their hearts are "touched in ways they will never forget." 

Donations continue to pour into the Cleveland Courage Fund. So far, $650,000 has been raised from more than 6,800 individual donations.

There is also a toy and clothing drive underway for Amanda Berry's daughter, Jocelyn. Learn how to donate HERE

Copyright 2013 WOIO. All rights reserved. 

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