911 tapes released in home invasion - wistv.com - Columbia, South Carolina |

911 tapes released in home invasion, suspects arrested

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Dameion Rhyhelee Rembert (Source: Richland County Sheriff's Department) Dameion Rhyhelee Rembert (Source: Richland County Sheriff's Department)
Jessica Lynn Hunt (Source: Alvin S. Glenn Detention Center) Jessica Lynn Hunt (Source: Alvin S. Glenn Detention Center)
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RICHLAND COUNTY, SC (WIS) -

WIS now has the 911 calls from a bold daytime robbery in which the homeowner came face to face with the suspect.

That suspect broke through two doors and stole generators, lawn equipment, and a big screen TV.

The doors to Kenny Wilson's garage and home were kicked in.  The man who investigators say did it was standing inside the house when Wilson called 911 from the bedroom.

"A gentleman was just talking to you about, someone has broken into my house and he can't find his brother," Wilson told the emergency dispatcher. 

"Someone has broken into your house and he can't find his brother?" was the dispatcher's response.

When Wilson gave dispatchers her address, they asked if she wanted to file a missing persons report.

"I don't know, it's his brother," Wilson responded. "I don't know who this gentleman is.  I heard the door banging and the next thing I know he's in my house. Please hurry!"

The dispatcher struggled to understand.

"So the person who is in your house, okay?" the dispatcher asked. "So you just heard, it's your neighbor right?"

"No I've never seen him," Wilson told them. "They're here with a U-Haul truck."

Two minutes go by before Wilson laid out the real emergency.

"Someone has broken into my house, the door is broken," she said. 

"So someone broke into your house?" the dispatcher asked.

"Yes," Wilson said. "I was asleep in the bedroom and I heard a loud banging and the next thing I know he's in my house."

The report shows five minutes in, officers were on the way. Dispatch escalated the call from a "report to meet an officer" to a "burglary just occurred." 

According to the Columbia Richland County Dispatch, dispatchers need to quickly know what the emergency is, what type of help you need, the location, whether the emergency is still in progress, who's calling, and whether there are weapons involved. 

Dispatchers got a description from Wilson.  

"Did you see what they had on?" the dispatcher asked. 

Wilson replied, "Yes, a yellow shirt and black and green shorts."

Wilson let dispatchers know the suspects were leaving as she broke down.

"He said he was calling police but I don't know whether he really called you," Wilson said. "I doubt it, and that's why I went in the bedroom. He said to get the cell phone and I thought I'd better call you to make sure he really called I didn't know what their intention was."

As the dispatcher apologized, Wilson could be heard sobbing.

The dispatcher stayed on the phone until officers arrived 19 minutes later.  The Sheriff's Department tells WIS on the way, deputies were looking for the suspects and the vehicle Wilson described.

Late Friday afternoon, the Richland County Sheriff's Department identified the suspects wanted in connection with this burglary.

Jessica Lynn Hunt was arrested Wednesday. Dameion Rhyhelee Rembert was taken into Monday morning.

Investigators say Rembert and Hunt used the same U-Haul truck to steal mulch from the Circle K on Clemson Road the day before the home invasion.

Deputies say Hunt rented the truck on May 4th and did not return it. Hunt and Rembert are charged with grand larceny and burglary. 

The City of Columbia provided this helpful information to explain the most effective way to contact emergency dispatch centers:

Q. WHEN SHOULD I CALL 911?
A. 911 is for emergencies, or situations that could become an emergency.
   Is there a threat to life or property?
   Are you or someone else the victim of a crime?
   Do you have a police, fire, or medical emergency?
If there is any doubt, the situation seems urgent, or has the potential to become dangerous; call 911. All non-emergency calls should be directed to our non-emergency number: 252-2911.
Q. WHAT IF I ACCIDENTALLY CALL 911?
A. If you accidentally dial 911, do not hang up. Stay on the line to let the dispatcher know that you are okay. Our dispatchers are trained to follow up on all hang up calls and to send the police if they suspect that something is wrong.
Q. WHY DOES THE DISPATCHER ASK ME SO MANY QUESTIONS, INSTEAD OF JUST SENDING ME HELP?
A. A common misconception is that responders are not being immediately notified because the dispatcher is asking so many questions; this is not the case. During most emergencies, another dispatcher is notifying the first responders while the call taker is still asking questions. The information you provide to the dispatcher is relayed to the first responders while they are on their way to the call.
Dispatchers are trained to ask a series of specific questions, in order to best determine the nature of the problem. The information provided by the caller can assist our first responders in determining what they will need in order to keep others safe and out of harm's way. In addition, these questions are designed to enhance the safety and response capabilities of our first responders by providing them accurate information with real time updates.
Q. WHAT QUESTIONS WILL THE DISPATCHER ASK ME?
A. What?
What is the emergency or need?
What type of assistance is required?
Where?
Where is the location of the emergency?
This is the address where the emergency is actually happening.

If you don't know the address then:

 Give cross streets or address range.
 Provide landmarks, business names or parks located near the emergency.
 Look at the house numbers in the area.
 If you are calling from inside a home or business, attempt to identify the address from mail.
Where did the incident take place?
If different from the caller's location.
Where is the suspect(s)?
Location and description of the suspect(s).
If the suspect(s) is gone, provide a physical description, last known direction of travel, and any vehicle description possible.
Where can we contact you?

When?
When did the incident take place?
This question establishes a timeline. Is the emergency still in progress, or is this a delayed or report only type call?
Who?
Who is calling and, what is the callback (contact) number?
WE DO NOT REQUIRE THE CALLER TO IDENTIFY THEMSELVES, THEY CAN REMAIN ANONYMOUS.
Who is the suspect?
Is the suspect known to the caller?
Who else is involved?
Again, the dispatcher will try to obtain as much descriptive information as possible for the first responders.
Weapons?
Are there weapons involved?
What type of weapon(s) is being used?
This is critical information for first responder's and citizen's safety.
Q. I HAVE BEEN ASKED TO HOLD DURING A 911 CALL; WHY?
A. Dispatchers are trained to perform several tasks simultaneously (multi-task). During times of heavy call volume, the dispatcher asking you questions may also be attempting to dispatch your call, respond to radio traffic, and/or update the first responders with critical information. Every effort is being made to ensure your call is dispatched as quickly and accurately as possible; your patience and understanding is appreciated.
Q. WHAT SHOULD I DO IF I CALL 911 AND THE PHONE RINGS SEVERAL TIMES; SHOULD I HANG UP AND CALL AGAIN?
A. Don't hang up; stay on the line. Although it is our goal to answer all 911 calls within 3 rings (10 seconds), during times of heavy call volume, there may not be a dispatcher immediately available to answer your call. Your call will be automatically routed into a pending queue, and answered in the order it is received. Hanging up and redialing 911 can actually delay our ability to get you help.

(Information provided by the City of Columbia Communications Division)

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