Plan to deepen Charleston Harbor running on schedule - wistv.com - Columbia, South Carolina

Plan to deepen Charleston Harbor running on schedule

CHARLESTON, SC (WCSC) -

Deepening Charleston Harbor from 45 to 50 feet will cost $300-million. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers says it's worth the hefty price tag.

"The value of the Charleston Harbor to our nation is hundreds-of-thousands of jobs," says Lieutenant Ed Chamberlayne, the lead on the project. "There's over 260,000 jobs estimated that benefit from Charleston harbor."

The project is still in the study phase and has been since 2011 as environmentalists, biologists, and economists weigh in on the impact of deepening, which will allow larger ships to come through.

Officials say the study will be completed in two years and within budget.

"We're still spending less than $13-million and four years to do a study, but we have limited our appetite to make sure we can answer the hard questions and make that ultimate recommendation to Congress," explains Chamberlayne.

A recommendation that will tout the harbor's value in commerce and need to accommodate large-scale economies.

"We're seeing ships carrying an excess of 9,000 containers on board," says Allison Skipper, the spokesperson for the South Carolina Ports Authority. "These ships are 1100 feet long or more. They're already coming here, and we know that will accelerate with the expansion of the Panama Canal in a couple years."

Chamberlayne says sequestration has not slowed them down. He says the President has made the project a priority.

"This study effort has not been impacted, and we do not foresee it to be impacted by it. It is part of the president's administration "We Can't Wait" initiative."

If Congress ultimately approves the deepening after the study is completed, officials say between design and construction, the process will take five to six years.

The last time the harbor was deepened, from 40 to 45 feet, was between 2004 and 2006.

  • South Carolina news on WIStv.comNEWSMore>>

  • Trump digs in on immigration amid family separation crisis

    Trump digs in on immigration amid family separation crisis

    Monday, June 18 2018 4:20 AM EDT2018-06-18 08:20:01 GMT
    Monday, June 18 2018 3:11 PM EDT2018-06-18 19:11:57 GMT
    (Butch Comegys/The Times-Tribune via AP). U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions speaks on immigration policy and law enforcement actions at Lackawanna College in downtown Scranton, Pa., on Friday, June 15, 2018.(Butch Comegys/The Times-Tribune via AP). U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions speaks on immigration policy and law enforcement actions at Lackawanna College in downtown Scranton, Pa., on Friday, June 15, 2018.

    Nearly 2,000 children were separated from their families over a six-week period in April and May after Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced a new "zero-tolerance" policy that refers all cases of illegal entry for criminal prosecution.

    More >>

    Nearly 2,000 children were separated from their families over a six-week period in April and May after Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced a new "zero-tolerance" policy that refers all cases of illegal entry for criminal prosecution.

    More >>
  • Supreme Court leaves door open to curbing partisan districts

    Supreme Court leaves door open to curbing partisan districts

    Monday, June 18 2018 10:40 AM EDT2018-06-18 14:40:07 GMT
    Monday, June 18 2018 3:31 PM EDT2018-06-18 19:31:12 GMT
    The Supreme Court is resolving partisan redistricting cases from Wisconsin and Maryland without ruling on the broader issue of whether electoral maps can give an unfair advantage to a political party. (Source: CNN)The Supreme Court is resolving partisan redistricting cases from Wisconsin and Maryland without ruling on the broader issue of whether electoral maps can give an unfair advantage to a political party. (Source: CNN)

    The Supreme Court is resolving partisan redistricting cases from Wisconsin and Maryland without ruling on the broader issue of whether electoral maps can give an unfair advantage to a political party.

    More >>

    The Supreme Court is resolving partisan redistricting cases from Wisconsin and Maryland without ruling on the broader issue of whether electoral maps can give an unfair advantage to a political party.

    More >>
  • Director: FBI won't repeat errors noted in watchdog report

    Director: FBI won't repeat errors noted in watchdog report

    Monday, June 18 2018 2:40 PM EDT2018-06-18 18:40:23 GMT
    Monday, June 18 2018 3:31 PM EDT2018-06-18 19:31:05 GMT
    (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite). Justice Department Inspector General Michael Horowitz, left, and FBI Director Christopher Wray wait to testify as the Senate Judiciary Committee examines the internal report of the FBI's Clinton email probe and the role ...(AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite). Justice Department Inspector General Michael Horowitz, left, and FBI Director Christopher Wray wait to testify as the Senate Judiciary Committee examines the internal report of the FBI's Clinton email probe and the role ...
    The Republican chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee says the Justice Department has a "serious credibility problem.".More >>
    The Republican chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee says the Justice Department has a "serious credibility problem.".More >>
Powered by Frankly