Married couple dies in burning home on Valentine's Day - wistv.com - Columbia, South Carolina

Married couple dies in burning home on Valentine's Day

It was a family get-together no one ever wanted. Four kids, four grandkids, and six grandchildren, and Edward and Harriett Hall started it all.

"I don't know how many fire trucks, must've been 10 or 15 really," said neighbor Charles Foberg.

Foberg lived across the street from the Halls. He says the Halls quickly welcomed his family to town.

"When we first moved here, she took us pecan picking, which in New Jersey, we didn't do a whole lot of," said Foberg.

The Hall family home was up in smoke Thursday night.

"Winnie, one of my dogs, she never barks like that," said Foberg. "I said, 'Oh, let me look,' and when I opened that door, all I saw was flames, deep flames, and I knew right away they weren't alive."

And they weren't. Almost everything burned to the ground. Harriett made it out, but soon died outside. Edward died inside.

The coroner says the smoke and the flames took the lives of the couple known for helping one another.

"He really, really loved her, and they were good to each other," said Foberg.

Even though they've left their home for good, it seems that lesson has been passed on.

It's not clear how the couple spent Valentine's Day together. We're told Edward would buy Harriet big cards on holidays like Valentine's Day or anniversaries.

Copyright 2013 WIS. All rights reserved.

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