Supreme Court denies parties' request for rehearing - wistv.com - Columbia, South Carolina |

Supreme Court denies parties' request for rehearing

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COLUMBIA, SC (WIS) – A motion filed Thursday morning by the South Carolina Republican Party, the state Democratic Party and the State Elections Commission asking for a rehearing in the ongoing candidate ballot saga has been denied by the Supreme Court.

An order handed down Thursday afternoon said "Our opinion...speaks for itself and stands as written. Accordingly, we deny the request for rehearing."

The parties had asked the court to hold another hearing in the case which barred dozens of candidates from 2012 ballots and to clarify its opinion.

The case looked at whether candidates for the upcoming primary and November election followed the laws in filing their Statement of Economic Interest forms on time. The filing deadline was March 15 at Noon, and required candidates to file the SEI at the same time they filed to run for office. Several candidates admitted to not filing these forms on time and some have admitted to not filing them at all.

In an order published Wednesday, the Supreme Court determined candidates that fell into those categories would not appear on the ballot in 2012.

It's a problem that has hampered both Democrats and Republicans.

USC political science professor Mark Tompkins says the entire filing process to run for office is set up to protect those already elected.

"The good ol' boys are winning again," Tompkins said. "This process feeds that story. It makes folks say, 'Gosh, the insiders have the edge in this process.'"

Tompkins jokes the court's decision could create a massive political movement in South Carolina.

"I predict we'll see some third party movement like, Republicans who really are Republicans, but didn't file on time," Tompkins said.

Both parties are now required to submit updated candidate lists to election officials by noon on Friday.

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SIDEBAR: Motion to Supreme Court NEW

Click here to read the motion filed to the Supreme Court.

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