New research on pipe dangers, patch effectiveness and gender differences - wistv.com - Columbia, South Carolina

New research on pipe dangers, patch effectiveness and gender differences

(National) June 1, 2004 - The latest research on smoking and health sheds new light on the safety of pipe smoking, nicotine patches and the risk of lung cancer among men and women.

A study of more than 200,000 people finds smoking a pipe may not be as risky as cigarettes, but it is just as dangerous as smoking cigars. Lung and larynx cancers are the biggest cancer risks linked to pipe smoking.

A second study suggests that when it comes to kicking the habit, the nicotine patch is the most effective way for smokers to reduce their intake of tobacco related toxins. So called "reduced exposure" cigarettes came in second, although researchers note that the products don't cut the rate of tobacco toxins as much as manufacturers claim.

Researchers have also uncovered evidence that contradicts the belief that women who smoke are more susceptible to lung cancer than men. The study of more than 80,000 people found no difference in the overall risk of lung cancer between the sexes.

Lung cancer rates in women have been catching up with men as more women have started lighting up, and some studies have suggested that differences in smoking habits and biology might make women more vulnerable to the cancer.

The three studies are published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

posted 3:11pm by Chris Rees

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